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Students in leadership positions learn about brain tumors and gain real world experience in running a non-profit business while raising funds for brain tumor research. Beneficiaries of the money we raise are Barrow Neurological Institute, National Brain Tumor Society, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Translational Genomics Research Institute, and University of Arizona.

"Be the change you wish to see in the world..." Gandhi

Our Beneficiaries

  • University of AZ Research Centers
    University of AZ Research Centers
  • “One of the great movements in my lifetime among educated people is the need to commit themselves to action. Most people are not satisfied with giving money; we also feel we need to work.”

    — Peter Drucker

Brain Tumor Research News

Using PET with the radiolabeled amino acid F-18 fluoroethyl-tyrosine (F-18-FET) can significantly help determine the efficacy of radiotherapy in certain cancer patients who develop brain metastases, according to a study in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.

The medical device company NeuroOne Medical Technologies Corporation's new thin-film electrode technology, Evo Cortical, offers a potentially faster and less invasive diagnostic tool for identifying brain abnormalities in patients with epilepsy and brain tumors.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has awarded Rare Pediatric Disease Designation (RPDD) for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of malignant glioma to OKN-007, an investigational drug discovered at the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and being developed by Oblato, Inc.

McMaster University researchers have identified a small molecule compound that can activate the Wnt pathway in non-Wnt subtypes of medulloblastoma, the most serious form of pediatric brain cancer, making these aggressive forms of the disease more susceptible to therapy.

Brain cancer in children is always a devastating diagnosis, but McMaster University researchers may have found a way to have the most serious types of pediatric brain cancer respond better to therapies.

Research has identified a small molecule compound that can activate the Wnt pathway in non-Wnt subtypes of medulloblastoma, making these aggressive forms of cancer more responsive to therapies. The work also found the Wnt pathway, which has historically been considered cancer-promoting, to function as a cancer inhibitor in certain contexts.

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