Students in leadership positions learn about brain tumors and gain real world experience in running a non-profit business while raising funds for brain tumor research. Beneficiaries of the money we raise are Barrow Neurological Institute, National Brain Tumor Society, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Translational Genomics Research Institute, and University of Arizona.

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Our Beneficiaries

  • University of AZ Research Centers
    University of AZ Research Centers
  • “One of the great movements in my lifetime among educated people is the need to commit themselves to action. Most people are not satisfied with giving money; we also feel we need to work.”

    — Peter Drucker

Brain Tumor News

There is some encouraging news in the battle against the deadliest form of brain cancer. It's an experimental drug that gets right to the tumor.

A new study by investigators finds that some types of glioblastoma tumors may be able to shed extracellular vesicles (EVs) - small packages of biomaterial - that can help to suppress the body's ability to mount an immune response against the tumor.

Called Tumor Treating Fields, the therapy was pioneered less than two decades ago by Israeli scientist Yoram Palti, who showed that when alternating electric fields are delivered at specific frequencies, they can disrupt the division of cancer cells and cause their death.

Investigators are seeking to determine whether the combination of eflornithine (alphadifluoromethylornithine) with lomustine can improve survival for patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma (AA).

New research described how deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) may improve MRI brain tumor segmentation. Computer engineering researchers proposed a high-capacity deep convolutional neural networks (DCNN) for the study.







Surgery, radiation and chemotherapy just don’t cut it against glioblastoma, a type of aggressive brain tumor with a dismal five-year survival rate. Survival is highest in younger people, at 19% for those aged 20 to 44, but it drops sharply with age, bottoming out at 5% for patients over 55. That’s why Gianpietro Dotti, of the University of North Carolina’s Department of Microbiology and Immunology, is working on an immunotherapy for glioblastoma, specifically, a chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy.

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