Students in leadership positions learn about brain tumors and gain real world experience in running a non-profit business while raising funds for brain tumor research. Beneficiaries of the money we raise are Barrow Neurological Institute, National Brain Tumor Society, Phoenix Children's Hospital, Translational Genomics Research Institute, and University of Arizona.

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Our Beneficiaries

  • University of AZ Research Centers
    University of AZ Research Centers
  • “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

    — Theodore Roosevelt

Brain Tumor News

A drug used to treat altitude sickness -- as well as glaucoma, epilepsy, heart failure and seizures -- may also offer significant gains for patients with a fast-growing brain tumor known as glioblastoma, according to a study published July 4, 2018, in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Dr. Helen Dooley and other academics around the world, believe that proteins harvested from shark blood could be the key to diagnosing and treating diseases that are hard to target with existing drugs.

The poliovirus could help some patients battle a lethal form of brain cancer, scientists report. An experimental treatment seems to have prolonged the lives of a small group of patients with a type of brain cancer called glioblastoma, according to research from Duke University, published on Tuesday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

A new study led by scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center has shown that an experimental drug known as AZ32 selectively sensitizes brain tumors to radiation and significantly extends the survival of mouse models with human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).

Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein orchestrates the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) to cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation (IR). ATM genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition results in tumor cell hypersensitivity to IR.

There’s been a groundbreaking find in the quest for a cure to an inoperable pediatric brain cancer. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, has a survival rate of zero. However, a new trial has finally found a safe way to deliver drugs to the brain stem tumor using “convection-enhanced delivery.”

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