WELCOME TO THE SSBTR WEBSITE!

Students in leadership positions learn about brain tumors and gain real world experience in running a non-profit business while raising funds for brain tumor research. Beneficiaries of the money we raise are Barrow Neurological Institute, National Brain Tumor Society, Phoenix Childrens Hospital, Steele Childrens Research Center in Tucson, and Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). With your help we can make a difference. The intent of our website is to further our objectives of disseminating information about this disease process, stimulating more widespread involvement within our community through donating, volunteering and participating in one or more of our events, and publicizing and promoting this exceptional student-run organization.

"Be the change you wish to see in the world..." Gandhi

Thanks for visiting. Your support is greatly appreciated.

Upcoming Events

Videos


Philanthropic "Quotes"

  • “I have found that among its other benefits, giving liberates the soul of the giver.”

  • “The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much, it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.”

  • “…the most useful and influential people [in America] are those who take the deepest interest in institutions that exist for the purpose of making the world better.”


RECENT BRAIN TUMOR ARTICLES

BLANK LINE

Brain Tumor News

  • Repurposing the old drug flavopiridol could be an effective strategy to cut short sugar availability and impair cancer growth.

  • Genetic tweaks to salmonella turn the bacteria into cancer-seeking missiles that produce self-destruct orders deep within tumors. Tests in rat models with extreme cases of the disease showed a remarkable 20 percent survival rate over 100 days -- roughly equivalent to 10 human years -- with the tumors going into complete remission.

  • Immunotherapy using genetically modified immune T-cells (CAR-T) to specifically target the glioma-associated marker IL13Rα2 — a gene expression indicative of an aggressive brain tumor — was reported to be a successful treatment for recurrent multifocal glioblastoma

  • New research out of the University of Michigan supports combining two approaches to fight back against gliomas: attacking the tumor with gene therapy while enhancing the immune system's ability to fight it, too.

  • Glioblastoma is the most common and most severe form of brain cancer. Of the 12,000 new cases diagnosed each year, 10,000 patients will die in about a year. But a new vaccine developed by researchers in Buffalo, New York, is showing promising results.

blank line

SSBTR in the News

© Copyright 2017